Call for Attorney Volunteers at International Airports Outside the US to Protect Refugees and Travelers

The below request for help comes from a group of lawyers organizing at Boston’s Logan Airport in response to the January 27, 2017 executive order on travel/immigration.  Please share with any overseas attorneys you know who may be in a position to help.  Thanks!


URGENT: Call for Attorney Volunteers at International Airports Outside the US to Protect Refugees and Travelers

Friday evening President Trump issued an Executive Order that, among other things, bars entry for citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries for at least 90 days, suspends the US refugee program for at least 120 days, and indefinitely bans Syrian refugees from resettlement in the US. Over the weekend, a number of federal courts issued temporary restraining orders that block the enforcement of the Executive Order. More legal action is underway.

Attorneys volunteering at US airports need your help: we have been notified that many travelers have been denied boarding for US-bound flights, and others are not aware of the temporary restraining orders upon arrival in the US.

This is where you come in: if you would be willing to volunteer at an airport near you, please sign up using the linked form. We need volunteer attorneys who can distribute updated information to affected travelers, collect contact information for affected travelers departing for the US, coordinate with attorney support teams at US points of entry, and provide US-based attorneys with updates on conditions at departing airports. No immigration experience is necessary, we will connect you with other volunteers in your area, and we will provide you with documents, forms, and instructions on how to get started.

Here is the link to volunteer:

https://goo.gl/forms/a6lD3fVMFmLUFDRR2

“‘No Body to be Kicked’? Monopoly, Financial Crisis, and Popular Revolt in 18th-Century Haiti and America”

Just out in Law and Literature: “‘No Body to be Kicked’? Monopoly, Financial Crisis, and Popular Revolt in 18th-Century Haiti and America.”

Here’s the abstract:

“Contemporary law and legal theory are resigned to the view that the corporation is a mere nexus of contracts, a legal person lacking both body and soul. This essay explores that commitment to the immateriality of the corporation through a discussion of the 18th-century revolt against the Indies Company in Saint-Domingue (Haiti) and British North America. Opponents of the joint-stock monopoly in these Atlantic settings believed, like critics of transnational corporate power today, that the company form represented a merger of wealth and power operating to subvert the liberties of disenfranchised outsiders. Financial crisis served to destabilize the fiscal and political environment that insulated the Indies Company from its critics, who took advantage of these openings by attacking the material embodiments of the corporation in the name of “free trade.” The 18th-century opposition to monopoly privilege suggests that corporate personality was neither dismissed as fiction nor accepted as reality, and that in some circumstances, at least, the corporate body could indeed be held to account for the sins of a person without conscience.”

Photos of a recent trip to Haiti (Part 2 of 2)

All photos © Malick W. Ghachem, 2016.  Please do not reproduce without permission.

Photos of a recent trip to Haiti (Part 1 of 2)

All photos © Malick W. Ghachem, 2016.  Please do not reproduce without permission.

Interview with “New Books in Caribbean Studies”

Although the book is not quite so “new” anymore, I enjoyed doing this recent interview on The Old Regime and the Haitian Revolution with Dan Livesay, editor of the “New Books in Caribbean Studies” podcast series.  An embedded link to the podcast appears directly below.

The Imitation Monticello and “Black Histories Matter”

In connection with a recent piece co-authored with Erica Caple James entitled “Black Histories Matter” that appears in the current issue of Perspectives, the AHA newsletter, here are photos (by ECJ) of the Somers, CT replica of Jefferson’s Monticello.  The article includes a photo of the original.

IMG_6895 3 smaller version IMG_6891 2